AskDefine | Define discipline

Dictionary Definition

discipline

Noun

1 a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings" [syn: subject, subject area, subject field, field, field of study, study, bailiwick, branch of knowledge]
2 a system of rules of conduct or method of practice; "he quickly learned the discipline of prison routine" or "for such a plan to work requires discipline";
3 the trait of being well behaved; "he insisted on discipline among the troops" [ant: indiscipline]
4 training to improve strength or self-control
5 the act of punishing; "the offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received" [syn: correction]

Verb

1 train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control; "Parents must discipline their children"; "Is this dog trained?" [syn: train, check, condition]
2 punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience; "The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently" [syn: correct, sort out]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Pronunciation

Etymology

From < < descipline and desciple < disciplina "instruction" and discipulus "pupil" from discere "to learn" < *dek- "(cause to) accept", other derivatives of which, and that preserve the IE. root and meaning, include doctor, document, doctrine and docent (all from L. docere) as well as dogma, dignity and decorate.

Derived terms

Translations

controlled behaviour
specific branch or knowledge or learning

Verb

  1. To train someone by instruction and practice.
  2. To teach someone to obey authority.
  3. To punish someone in order to gain control.
  4. To impose order on someone.

Translations

to train someone by instruction and practice
to teach someone to obey authority
to punish someone in order to gain control
to impose order on someone

Italian

Noun

discipline
  1. Plural of disciplina

Extensive Definition

In its most general sense, discipline refers to systematic instruction given to a disciple. This sense also preserves the origin of the word, which is Latin disciplina "instruction", from the root discere "to learn," and from which discipulus "disciple, pupil" also derives.
To discipline thus means to instruct a person or animal to follow a particular code of conduct, or to adhere to a certain "order." Consequently, "in the field of child development, discipline refers to methods of modeling character and of teaching self-control and acceptable behavior." So for example, to discipline a child to wash its hands before meals. Here, 'washing hands before meals' is a particular pattern of behaviour, and the child is being disciplined to adopt that pattern. 'To disciple' also gives rise to the word disciplinarian, which denotes a person who enforces order. An ideal disciplinarian is one who can enforce order without coercion for "family specialists agree that using physical force, threats and put-downs can interfere with a child's healthy development." Usually however, the phrase 'to discipline' carries a negative connotation. This is because enforcement of order - that is, ensuring instructions are carried out - is often regulated through punishment.cf.
To be disciplined is then, subject to context, either a virtue (the ability to follow instructions well) or a euphemism for punishment (which may also be referred to as disciplinary procedure). As a concrete noun, the discipline refers to an instrument of punishment, for example in mortification of the flesh (see also: flagellation). Such an instrument may also be applied to oneself, for example in penitence for not being sufficiently self-disciplined.
Self-discipline refers to the training that one gives one's self to accomplish a certain task or to adopt a particular pattern of behaviour, even though one would really rather be doing something else. For example, denying oneself of an extravagant pleasure in order to accomplish a more demanding charitable deed. Thus, self-discipline is the assertion of willpower over more base desires, and is usually understood to be a synonym of 'self control'. Self-discipline is to some extent a substitute for motivation, when one uses reason to determine a best course of action that opposes one's desires.
School discipline refers to regulation of children and the maintenance of order ("rules") in schools. These rules may, for example, define the expected standards of clothing, timekeeping, social behaviour and work ethic. The term may also be applied to the punishment that is the consequence of transgression of the code of behavior. For this reason the usage of school discipline sometimes means the administration of punishment, rather than behaving within the school rules.
Church discipline is a response of an ecclesiastical body to some perceived wrong, whether in action or in doctrine. Its most extreme form in modern churches is excommunication. Church discipline can also refer to the rules governing some ecclesiastical order, such as priests or monks, such as clerical celibacy.
An academic discipline refers to a body of knowledge that is being given to - or has been received by - a disciple. The term may then denotes a 'sphere of knowledge' that an individual has chosen to specialise in. In an institute of higher learning, the term 'discipline' is often a synonym of 'faculty'.
In unionised companies, discipline may be a regulated part of a collective bargaining agreement and subject to grievance procedures.

References

discipline in Danish: Disciplin
discipline in Spanish: Disciplina
discipline in Swedish: Disciplina

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

Spartanism, academic discipline, academic specialty, accommodate, accommodate with, accord, adapt, adapt to, adjust, adjust to, administer, administrate, administration, agree with, anality, aplomb, apple-pie order, applied science, apprentice, apprenticeship, area, arena, art, assimilate to, astringency, austerity, authoritarianism, basic training, be guided by, be master, beat, bend, bound, boundary, bounds, break, break in, breaking, breed, breeding, bridle, bring to account, bring to book, bring up, call to account, captain, castigate, castigation, chair, chasten, chastening, chastise, chastisement, check, chime in with, civil government, classical education, coach, command, comply, comply with, compose, composure, concern, condign punishment, condition, conditioning, conduct, confine, confinement, conform, constraint, contain, continence, control, copyright, core curriculum, correct, correction, correspond, course, course of study, criticize, cultivate, cultivation, curb, curriculum, deal with, decorum, demandingness, demesne, department, department of knowledge, deserts, develop, development, direct, direction, disciplinary measures, dispensation, disposition, domain, draw the line, drill, drilling, edify, educate, elective, empery, empire, enlighten, exactingness, exercise, fall in with, ferule, fetch up, fetching-up, field, field of inquiry, field of study, fine fettle, fit, follow, form, form of government, foster, fostering, gear to, general education, general studies, go by, good condition, good shape, good trim, govern, governance, government, grimness, groom, grooming, guide, harmonize, harshness, head, hedge about, hold in check, housebreak, housebreaking, humanities, improve, improvement, in-service training, inculcate, inculcation, independence, indoctrinate, indoctrination, inflict upon, infliction, inform, inhibit, instruct, instruction, judgment, judicial punishment, keep in check, keep in line, lead, liberal arts, lick into shape, limit, limitation, major, make conform, manage, management, manual training, masthead, meet, method, methodicalness, methodology, meticulousness, military training, minor, moderate, moderation, mold, narrow, natural science, neatness, nemesis, nurse, nurture, nurturing, observe, officer, ology, on-the-job training, orb, orbit, order, orderliness, overcome, oversight, pains, pains and punishments, patent, pay, payment, penal retribution, penalize, penalty, penology, pillory, political organization, polity, possession, practice, preparation, prepare, prescription, preside over, proscription, proseminar, province, punish, punishment, punition, pure science, put in tune, put to school, quadrivium, qualification, qualify, raise, raising, ready, readying, realm, rear, rearing, rebuke, reconcile, rectify, reduce, refresher course, regime, regimen, regiment, regimentation, register, regnancy, regulate, regulation, rehearsal, rehearse, reign, reprimand, reprove, restrain, restraint, restrict, restriction, retribution, retributive justice, ride herd on, rigid discipline, rod, round, routine, rub off corners, ruggedness, rule, run, scant, school, schooling, science, scientific education, scourge, self-command, self-conquest, self-control, self-denial, self-discipline, self-government, self-mastery, self-possession, self-restraint, seminar, send to school, settle, settle with, severity, shape, sloyd, social science, sovereignty, specialize, specialty, sphere, square accounts, stand over, sternness, stint, straighten, straiten, strictness, stringency, study, subdiscipline, subdue, subject, subjection, subjugate, suit, supervise, supervision, sway, system, system of government, systematicness, take in hand, take to task, tally with, teach, technical education, technicology, technics, technology, tidiness, toughness, train, training, trimness, trivium, upbringing, visit upon, vocational education, vocational training, walk, well-deserved punishment, what-for, wield authority, willpower, yield
Privacy Policy, About Us, Terms and Conditions, Contact Us
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
Material from Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Dict
Valid HTML 4.01 Strict, Valid CSS Level 2.1